Advanced Chordacus

See the modes with Chordacus!

To help you see the modes clearly, more colours to indicate the new intervals have been added in Chordacus.

It is vital that you know your barre chord shapes and minor and Major pentatonic shapes before you start studying the modes as they are built upon these.

Let’s start with examining the major modes.


The major modes in Chordacus

We colour coordinate the extra notes you add to a pentatonic in order to create all major modes.

The intervals you need to add to the Major Pentatonic in order to build the major modes are 4 and 7.

The 4 could also be a #4, the 7 could also be a b7. The lower the interval, the darker the shade, like this.

  • 4 – dark brown
  • #4 – light brown
  • 7 – light brown
  • b7 – dark brown

The Ionian mode

This is an example of the Ionian mode in C, as an E shape.
Cesi

  • Can you see a red chord shape inside the scale?
  • Can you see the Major Pentatonic shape if you combine red with yellow?
  • Can you see how by adding the 4th and the 7th you get the full Ionian mode?

The Lydian mode

This is an example of the Lydian mode in C, as an E shape.
Cesl

  • Can you see a red chord shape inside the scale?
  • Can you see the Major Pentatonic shape if you combine red with yellow?
  • Can you see how by adding the #4th and the 7th you get the full scale?

The Mixolydian mode

This is an example of the Mixolydian mode.
Cesm

  • Can you see a red chord shape inside the scale?
  • Can you see the Major Pentatonic shape if you combine red with yellow?
  • Can you see how by adding the 4th and the b7th you get the full scale?

The minor modes in Chordacus

We need to add two intervals to the Minor Pentatonic in order to create our minor modes.

Just like the major modes, these are also colour coordinated, a lower interval is darker than a higher interval, like this:

  • b2 -dark lilac
  • 2 -light lilac
  • b6 -dark lilac
  • 6 -light lilac

The Aeolian mode

This is an example of a Chordacus image displaying the Aeolian mode in an Em shape.
Aemsa

  • Can you see a red chord shape inside the scale?
  • Can you see the Minor Pentatonic shape if you combine red with blue?
  • Can you see how by adding the 2 and the b6 you get the full scale?

The Dorian mode

This is an example of a Chordacus image displaying the Dorian mode as an Em shape.
Aemsd

  • Can you see a red chord shape inside the scale?
  • Can you see the Minor Pentatonic shape if you combine red with blue?
  • Can you see how by adding the 2 and the 6 you get the full scale?

The Phrygian mode

This is an example of a Chordacus image displaying the Phrygian mode in an Em shape.
Aemsp

  • Can you see a red chord shape inside the scale?
  • Can you see the Minor Pentatonic shape if you combine red with blue?
  • Can you see how by adding the b2 and the b6 you get the full scale?

The Phrygian Dominant mode

This is an example of the Phrygian Dominant mode in A. It is based on the Minor Pentatonic as it is so closely related to Phrygian. The only difference is that we now have a major 3rd instead of a minor.

Aemspd

  • Can you see a red chord shape inside the scale?
  • Can you see the Minor Pentatonic shape if you combine red with blue, although the third is different?
  • Can you see how, by adding the b2 and the b6, you get the full scale?

Summary

Chordacus helps you see the modes as an extension of the barre chord shapes and the pentatonic scale. By colour coordinating everything, the new added intervals highlight what makes each mode.

This is the way you should be thinking when you build and play them as well. The extra notes are what makes the mode.

Take the advanced course and get step by step instructions on how to put all of these modes to use when you arrange, write or improvise on the guitar.

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